Wikis work as business collaboration tools

JIBE Event #2
Wikis are a collaborative web based tool that allows users to share in not just reading information but adding and amending content as a group process.

Creative Commons License photo credit: Robert Sanzalone

Wikipedia defines wiki’s as 

“A wiki is a website that uses wiki software, allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages, using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYGtext editor, within the browser.[1][2] Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites, to power community websites, and for note taking. The collaborative encyclopediaWikipedia is one of the best-known wikis.[2] Wikis are used in business to provide intranet and knowledge management systems. Ward Cunningham, the developer of the first wiki software, WikiWikiWeb, originally described it as “the simplest online database that could possibly work.”[3]

“Wiki” (English pronunciation: /wiːkiː/) is a Hawaiian word for “fast”.[4] “Wiki” can be expanded as “What I Know Is,” but this is a backronym.”

A recent study of “Why Businesses Don’t Collaborate” by Stewart Mader and Scott Abel highlights the fact that employees rely heavily on email to communicate and collaborate and most feel inundated and overwhelmed with the sheer volume of messages and attachments. Frequently those attachments are less than 2 pages long and could be easily added to a wiki – adding value to the overall group collaboration and shared knowledge-base. As it is, 82% of those polled received dozens of emails a day and found that due to the volume important information was often lost or overlooked, adding it to a wiki would solve not just for the reduction of emails sent but key information being skipped over or deleted.

Has your business moved away from emails to a collaborative wiki for knowledge management? How smooth was the transition?

If you’re ready to get started with a wiki, there is a great open source option called Twiki. You can check Twiki out here at their website twiki.org .

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